Search

International Research on Salt-Coated Masks & Air Filters


Since ancient times, mankind has used salt to prevent the spoilage of certain foods, namely meats. Our ancestors may not have understood the reasons why salt was a great preservative, but because of advances in science, we know exactly how salt destroys certain bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Some countries have started researching the anti-microbial effects of salt and how to utilize it in the creation of protective equipment that might reduce the spread of viruses like Covid-19.


Salt is considered hygroscopic, meaning it attracts water through the process of osmosis. When certain bacteria, fungi, or viruses are subject to a high salt environment the salt actually pulls water out of the microbes, leading to an extreme state of dehydration. This affects the microbe’s ability to carry out reproduction and maintain cellular functions. Eventually, the microbe will die off.


In theory, then, it would make sense that using masks or air filters with a coating of sodium chloride would have the same effect if coming into contact with susceptible microbes. One might also conclude that the micronized salt particles that you inhale during halotherapy might also have beneficial effects on any microbes present in the respiratory tract. There is a reason that the salt miners from Poland had healthy lungs. You can try halotherapy today at Salted Desert and begin to “preserve” your respiratory health.

Be well,

Nurse Pete


Follow the link below to read more about research in salt technologies:

https://www.cadth.ca/salt-based-technologies-help-stop-spread-coronavirus



8 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All