December is COPD awareness month


November is a good month to focus on lung health. It’s the start of the colder months in most of North America, and that means more people clustering together and spreading those nasty winter viruses like the flu, RSV, and Covid. In addition, November happens to be designated as COPD Awareness Month. Chances are you know someone that has been diagnosed with this chronic and debilitating disease.


COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, affects millions of people worldwide. It’s an inflammatory lung disease that obstructs the flow of air into the lungs, eventually leading to worsening oxygenation and the buildup of excess carbon dioxide. The damage to the lungs is irreversible, however, with consistent treatments, COPD can be managed and the disease progression slowed.


The hallmark sign of COPD is inflammation of the air passages. This typically manifests as progressively worsening shortness of breath and excess phlegm/mucus production. The airways become inflamed and narrowed with thick secretions and it becomes hard for sufferers to feel like they get a full breath of air. Symptoms can include wheezing, chest tightness, fatigue, and recurrent respiratory infections.


The exact cause of an individual’s COPD will vary, but it is caused by chronic exposure to irritants in the respiratory system. Chemical and environmental air pollutants can lead to COPD, but the most common irritant is tobacco smoke. Many long-term smokers will eventually develop some degree of COPD.


Typical medical treatment for COPD consists of the use of steroids and inhalers that dilate, or open up, inflamed airways. In addition to standard medical treatment, COPD sufferers may find some symptom relief in the form of salt inhalation therapy, or halotherapy. This therapy is drug-free, non-invasive, and uses the natural power of salt. Salt inherently attracts moisture, and when it reaches the lining of the airways it will help to thin out thick mucus making it easier to clear. Salt is also antimicrobial and when pathogens, such as bacteria, are exposed to a high-salt environment many cannot survive.


If you’ve been diagnosed with COPD, or just want general respiratory health, come in and try halotherapy today. Although everyone responds differently, you might be surprised at how your symptoms improve even after one session. For more information visit our website at www.salteddesert.com.


Stay safe and be well,

Nurse Pete